Ecosystem Science & Management

Bob Lyons_2012 283

 

Dr. Robert Lyons

 Professor

 E-mail: rk-lyons@tamu.edu

 

BACKGROUND

About 60 percent (90 million acres) of the land area in Texas is classified as rangeland. This area provides grazing for livestock species as well as habitat for numerous wildlife species. It also serves as a watershed to supply creeks, rivers, aquifers, and reservoirs. Brush management is a major issue for livestock producers and well as wildlife managers. In certain situations, brush densities can intercept and/or transpire significant amounts of annual rainfall that could potentially go to productive purposes. Livestock use of riparian areas is coming under increasing scrutiny relative to water quality. Drought is a fact of Texas life and drought management has been a major educational effort among counties in the past few years.

CURRENT PROJECTS

Ž Dow AgroSciences New Herbicide Testing to determine susceptible brush species, efficacy rates, and application timing.

Ž DuPont MAT28 Herbicide Testing to determine susceptible brush species, efficacy rates, and application timing.

Ž Lone Star Healthy Streams Project which is investigating various best management practices to reduce riparian grazing and concurrent bacterial contamination.

Ž Effects of Brush Removal on Distributed Recharge of the Carrizo-Wilcox Aquifer

Upper Llano River Watershed Protection Plan will assist the South Llano Watershed Alliance with development and implementation of a water protection plan.

Ž Work with County Extension Agents to establish applied research projects and to support their educational programs.

IMPACTS 

Regional/state: provide improved grazing and brush management options for landowners.

National: extend results of riparian best-management grazing practices to other states.

OPPORTUNITIES & COLLABORATIONS

ŽContinued work with Dow AgroSciences and DuPont.

ŽExtension of applied research results to landowners and managers.

Comments are closed.